In a Vase on Monday – Bromeliad Cachepot

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I decided to do something different this week. This is a pot of Bromeliad cuttings from my garden. The cuttings are in a 1 gallon nursery container double potted inside the cachepot. These Bromeliads are so bulletproof they are planted in old dried out potting soil and sand, a very well drained mix that will serve them well for months to come.

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Here is one of the cuttings, a Super Fireball Neoreglia, wonderful groundcover and hard to kill. One of my favorites. It grows almost on a runner (actually a stolon), the mother plant (on the left) dies and generally makes two or three pups like this one. The mother plant is cut off and  thrown away, I always feel bad about this. The roots are left intact and placed inside the nursery container.

Super Fireball Neoregelia in the garden, cold weather makes the red and peach coloration come out, these are closer to green in summer.

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Another  view:

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The cachepot is Portmerion, bought years ago on an antiqueing mission with my mother. The pot is a favorite of mine, but I rarely have houseplants as I have a strong tendency to kill them. The Bromeliads should last for months and root into the pot.

From above:

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These are all Neoregelia Bromeliads, grown primarily for foliage. The flowers are not very exciting. I know two of the four varieties – there are 3500 types of Bromeliads and I lost track of some or never knew the name ( i.e. bought at a garage sale for 5 bucks) The bigger chartruese plant with the red center (the center turns red with cooler weather) is a Blushing Bromeliad (Neoregelia carolinae). The Burgundy with green center and no spots is Super Fireball, the spotted ones I have not a clue the species. The grey plant in the foreground is a succulent – a Graptosedum of some kind that a friend gave to me, they enjoy the same soil conditions and I have a few in containers with Bromeliads on the porches at my house. Spanish moss is used for fill in the edges (and hide the black plastic nursery pot) is also a Bromeliad (Tillandsia usneoides)

Happy Gardening!

For more vases from around the world, visit Cathy at http://www.ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com.

13 comments on “In a Vase on Monday – Bromeliad Cachepot

  1. The Bromeliads look really interesting potted together.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Cathy says:

    What a colourful display, Amelia, especially grouped together like this. Oh, and sadly I am with you on houseplants ( except for a sizeable ficus and palm, both of which I do remember to water and mist regularly!)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Chloris says:

    Gorgeous and they look particularly good in that fabulous vase. Beautiful and long lasting, what more could you ask?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Eliza Waters says:

    Very nice! It’s good to mix it up on IAVOM and you’ve created something that will last a good long while. I esp. like the spotted ones.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Linda Casper says:

    That vase looks stunning

    Liked by 1 person

  6. pbmgarden says:

    These are gorgeous. The pot is perfect to hold them.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Kris P says:

    You Floridians do bromeliads so much better than Californians!

    Like

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