In a Vase on Monday – Late Bloomers

The nearly precipitation free summer pushed some of the usual fall flowers later this year and extended the summer blooms on others. I can’t remember the Muhly Grass starting to flower later than the first week of September or a summer without Beach Sunflowers. But here they are together in late October. I will admit to adding Osmocote a few weeks ago when we had some reliable rainfall.

The mysteries of gardening are teasing my brain once again.

The South Florida heat and humidity is abating in fits and starts. We have a lovely sunny weather forecast for the next 10 days. I have been clearing off the porch and replacing the cushions for winter outdoor living. This always takes longer than I think it will. I hope to be sitting on the porch with a glass of wine this week and maybe get in touch with my inner Floridian by making smoked fish dip appetizers.

The vase is an olive oil cruet inherited from my mother. As a lifelong gardener, I think she would approve of this repurposing.

The flowers:

In white, possibly the last of the year, Bridal Bouquet Frangipani (Plumeria pudica); yellow daisies are Beach Sunflowers (Helianthus debilis); sage green flowers are Soap Aloe (Aloe saponaria); the ropy stems are Blue Porterweed (Stachytarpeta jamaicaensis) – the blue flowers fell off on the way inside, but I like the stems; pink flowers are Tropical Red Salvia (Salvia coccinea); green flowers in background are Sweet Almond (Aloysia virgata), lending a fragrant assist to the Frangipani. In the background are the late, great Muhly Grass (Muhlebergia capillaris).

That’s all from my garden. Thank you to Cathy at http://www.ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com for hosting. Follow the link to see more vases…

Happy Gardening!!!

21 comments on “In a Vase on Monday – Late Bloomers

  1. It seems late for plumeria. I grew one once with no luck.

    Like

  2. Cathy says:

    Oh the grass is the real star here, Amelia, drawing the eye upwards and then back to the other blooms – we are certainly making hay while the sun shines and grabbing blooms while we can, before the season turns completely

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Eliza Waters says:

    Beautiful, I love the fountain of Muhly grass!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Kris P says:

    The muhly grass is spectacular and adds a wonderful sense of movement to the arrangement. Of course I love the Plumeria too. Weather conditions have had odd effects on the garden here as well. We had a short heatwave again last week but are now enjoying a stretch of cool weather; however, the prospects for rain are once again abysmal.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Timelesslady says:

    I love the grass. I think it is a variety I sometimes press when the seeds drop, they turn a beautiful translucent ecru and give a great feathery look. They are pretty in your vase too.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Horticat says:

    Your muhly grass looks great and reminds me that I must remember to include some grass seed heads in future arrangements. Love the olive oil bottle too – looks like a genie could pop out of there. Wine and smoked fish appetisers on the porch – that sounds wonderful!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. tonytomeo says:

    Ah, the frangipani again! My cuttings (of the common sort) defoliated, and are mostly looking happy.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Cathy says:

    The muhly grass is lovely. I tried growing it once but it succumbed to a very hard winter before it had a chance to flower! I do like the oil cruet you used. We will be bringing the outdoor furniture in, just as you move outdside, although I must say it has been a very mild October here. Enjoy your porch time!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Muhly grass has a huge range, it grows to New England here. I think drainage is what gets it. It grows in pure sand in my garden, I could not grow it in the clay soil further north. Still working on the porch.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. pbmgarden says:

    Interesting how dry you’ve been–we too. The Frangipani is a sentimental favorite.

    Liked by 1 person

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