In a Vase on Monday – Torched

When September starts winding down and the Fall Equinox approaches there is an ever so subtle change in the weather and South Floridians feel less torched. Or maybe less scorched. The daily high temperatures are less than 90 degrees F/32 C. Eighty eight degrees with less humidity is refreshingly cooler. Sort of.

While searching for vase contents, I was happy to see a new bough of flowers on the Tropical Gardenias, then decided to cut the Flaming Torch Bromeliads as the centerpiece of the arrangement. The flowers are most likely courtesy of many late afternoon thundershowers in the past weeks.

A closer view:

The pink flowers are Flaming Torch Bromeliads (Billbergia pyramidalis), AKA Hurricane Bromeliads as they typically flower during peak Atlantic hurricane season. These are sort of a passalong plant in South Florida. I cannot recall ever seeing one for sale, these were shared with me.The white flowers are Tropical Gardenias (Tabernaemontana diviricata) – I am wondering how long these will flower, it seems I have had them most of the summer off and on. Green dreadlocks and varigated foliage belong to the ‘Java White’ Copperleaf (Acalypha wilkesiana). I am not sure it the dreadlocks are buds or seeds or flowers, so I took a close up.

Any thoughts? I have three groups of Java White in the garden and this is the only one with dreadlocks. The mystery continues.

Thanks to Cathy at http://www.ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com for hosting this weekly meme. To see more, probably cooler vases, follow the link.

Happy Gardening!!

16 comments on “In a Vase on Monday – Torched

  1. pbmgarden says:

    Very nice shape to this vase and lovely flowers. The ‘Java White’ Copperleaf is pretty cool.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Cathy says:

    I was a bit concerned when I first saw your title….! That Copperleaf is indeed an intriguing plant, and what a great addition to your torched vase – it certainly helps to cool down some of the heat from the fiery bromeliad

    Liked by 1 person

    • We are in the grips of our rainy season until the end of November. Then fire worries begin, though they burn undergrowth here and do a good job with containing fires. Thanks,,

      Like

      • Cathy says:

        Yes, such fires can be devastating. We sometimes have them in the UK on open moorland, usually caused by carelessness, but they are nowhere near the huge scale of those in the US and Australia

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Kris P says:

    The shift in the direction of fall is also subtle here, although we reached down into the mid 70sF last week. Our dreadful Santa Ana winds are supposed to return starting today so this week may not be nearly as pleasant. I love the bromeliad flower. My own bromeliads are sparing with their blooms if they produce them at all. Based on the “dreadlock” shown on the far right in your closeup photo of the Acalypha, I’d say the green dreadlock is comprised of buds that open up into tiny white flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Eliza Waters says:

    Beautiful arrangement! I love the contrast of the bromeliad flower and the Acalypha, so nice!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. tonytomeo says:

    Yes; I mean that the copperleaf bloom seems to be all three; buds bloom and seed structures. Those on the left of the picture seem to be unbloomed buds. Those on the right seem to be either bloomed or producing seed. Since the bloom is not as flashy as that of other species, it does what it must discretely, and then goes to seed. Of course, that is only a guess. I am unfamiliar with the genus.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Cathy says:

    The dreadlocks are intriguing and on a close look remind me of sorrel flowers/seeds. Their flowers are barely noticeable on long stems like these and the seeds then take a while to ripen before crumbling out of these long stalks. Obviously not related, but definite similarities!

    Like

  7. I have missed your arrangements. This one is fresh and interesting. Let me check out a few others now! Big hugs to you, Amy.

    Liked by 1 person

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