The Hurricane Report

Several people have asked what goes on during a hurricane. I have written about my hurricane experience, having recently been missed by ongoing Hurricane Dorian. This experience is not a recommended addition to anyone’s bucket list.

Here is the report:

First, days or weeks before the Hurricane actually forms, it pops up on an NOAA Map like this:

Screenshot 2019-09-05 at 2.22.05 PM

X marks the spot where a tropical depression might or might not form, percentages are the chance it forms in 2 days and existing hurricanes and storms are on the map. Tropical depressions are the genesis of the hurricane. By looking further on the website you can find tracks of all storms and see where they are predicted to go, many go out to sea, never a threat to land. The #3 disturbance is worrisome because this time of year many hurricanes originate there, and end up in the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic coast of the US and Canada. These are called Cape Verde hurricanes, named after the nearby islands.

We started watching Dorian a week or so ago when it passed by Puerto Rico as a tropical storm, and kept heading our way. As the days go by the cone of probability (basically a graphic of the current idea of where the hurricane might make landfall) The cone (current idea) goes from place to place as the weather forecasters push and pull their modeling forecasts. These can (and do) vary by hundreds of miles as the storms and computers meander. I read at the start of the storm season that the new tracking software made them 20 miles more accurate than last year. Not feeling better about that. The Weather channel’s ratings go up, drama ensues. Inevitably, the storm ends up going through my Living Room at 130 mph at some point. (on the cone computer graphic)

Screenshot 2019-09-05 at 2.31.19 PM

We put up our hurricane shutters when things start looking dicey.  Dorian got dicey at the end of last week. The shutters are aluminum and are screwed on to threaded posts embedded in the window trim. All windows and doors that are not hurricane rated are covered as well as screen porches. It is a huge pain to install all this stuff. The clear shutter is so you can see what is going on outside. In addition to shuttering the windows, it is necessary to stockpile food and water and a gas-powered generator is a very handy thing if the power goes out, of course then gas is needed. We were very well prepared. And the power did not even blink. It was too windy to go outside off and on for 2 or 3 days, all grocery stores, make that all stores were closed (except one gas station with a deli) and bridges to the barrier islands were closed.

IMG_20190905_143751

The wind swirled around our house at 30 or 40 mph off and on for a couple of days. The constant high pitched whine and the wind rattling the metal shutters get a bit nerve-wracking after a while. Fortunately, Hurricane Dorian’s extremely high winds stayed offshore, here is where we are relative to the storm:

Screenshot 2019-09-04 at 4.27.47 PM

Too close for comfort. Way too close. My garden is surprisingly unscathed. I did pick the Papayas fearing smoothies on my house instead of in my glass. The Papayas are still ripening on the counter.

img_20190901_083304

We are feeling lucky and blessed. And collecting things for those poor souls in the Bahamas who lived through days of Dorian’s wrath.

Send some thoughts, good vibes or items to the Bahamas.

8 comments on “The Hurricane Report

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    So glad you dodged this one, but my heart goes out to those poor Bahamians. I cannot imagine what they are going through right now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • My heart is with yours, we had the weather on for hours, like watching the destruction of civilization. Or we were watching that. The local outpouring of love and support for the Bahamas is amazing. Every boat. plane or helicopter that can be had is headed over with supplies.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The hurricane has been on our local weather forecast even though there is no chance of it coming near us. I have been keeping track, as many of my blogging friends live on the east coast. Thanks for the detailed update. It is heartbreaking to see the Bahamas.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It will – have you been reading about the year two hurricanes struck the same place three weeks apart? That is where I live. It was never the same and a lot of people left.

    Like

  4. Good job here Queen
    I am glad you fared well.

    Like

  5. It was a windy day here yesterday and as I worked outside for 6 hours I was thinking of the Bahamians. The noise wears you down so I cannot imagine how dreadful it must be to be in the house listening waiting and praying for it to move on. Nice papayas!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s