In a Vase on Monday – Sunspots

This is Helianthus annuus uno. My first sunflower ever. I fell in love with sunflowers after seeing fields of them during a summer spent in Italy when I was in college. For some reason, I have never grown any. Probably did not want to stake them. This one is ‘Sunspot Dwarf’, a two foot tall plant advertised to have 10″ wide flowers, the flower is not quite that big nor is the plant that tall. However, I am growing them in December in South Florida, so who really knows. I am, nonetheless, thrilled to have and cut them.

I bought seed this fall from Sow True Seed https://sowtrueseed.com/ in Asheville, North Carolina. Their packages read that they are committed to supporting a sovereign seed system. I had to look that one up. I am in favor of non GMO anything. Here is the definition:

The farmer’s right to breed and exchange diverse open source seeds which can be saved and which are not patented, genetically modified, owned or controlled by emerging seed giants.

Further instructions are on the seed packages as to how to save the seed. Fascinating, though, I will probably cut all these sunflowers. I cut this one and left it in the grow bag to see if side shoots will produce more flowers. Gardening, the constant experiment.

A closer view:

Along with the sunflower are zinnias from the bag garden. I have a Cactus Mix and Pink Cactus. I am not sure where the pink one came from. The green ones are from ‘Green Envy’ Zinnias I have growing in a hot color bed in my front garden.

The foliage view:

Green foliage is Asian Sword Fern. The red varigated leaves are from an unnamed Ti Plant (Cordyline fruticosa). There are a zillion varieties of these floating around South Florida. My favorite name is Twisted Sister, I picked this one up at a Master Gardeners sale for a few dollars. My favorite kind of plant.

Thanks to Cathy at http://www.ramblinginthegarden.wordpress.com for hosting IAVOM. To see more vases, follow the link to her blog.

Happy Gardening.

21 comments on “In a Vase on Monday – Sunspots

  1. pbmgarden says:

    It’s a beautiful sunflower, especially in that close-up of the interior. Thanks for the info about your seed source.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That is interesting info about the seeds. It really looks like a summer vase, which is nice to see in the winter.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Cathy says:

    Congratulations on your first Florida sunflower! 😃🌻 It’s a lovely happy mix of flowers and foliage for me to behold on such a dismal December day here! Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Noelle says:

    Your pleasure in your first sunflower is palpable. I can sense you will be looking forward to the next one and the next one, and grow different types too. You’ve displayed it beautifully along with the zinnias and foliage.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Cathy says:

    Much as I admire your ‘tropical’ vases full of amazing plants I had never come across before. I think I may prefer these simpler ones, so carefully structured. Your spots of colour work perfectly against the beautiful curated leaves. I grow some dwarf sunflowers too, and many of them do branch well, producing flowers over a long period

    Liked by 1 person

  6. tonytomeo says:

    Gee, I forget that ti is a Cordyline. I have actually seen it here! Most started out as houseplants, then got too big, so went into the garden, where they did not succumb to frost as expected. Some of the houseplants may have started out as those small ti plan souvenirs that used to be sold at the airport in Honolulu.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Kris P says:

    As surprised as I’ve been by your fall/winter Zinnias, seeing a sunflower in bloom this time of year was an absolute shock! (if it helps any, my summer-blooming sunflowers never grow as big as the packages claim they will either.) I love the Cordyline foliage in your vase too and wish I could grow some of the varieties with hefty leaves like that here.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Eliza Waters says:

    Congrats on your first sunflower! It is a pretty one and I’m always interested in low-growing ones as mine are apt to tumble during winds at the peak of bloom. Thanks also for the link to the seed company. I definitely support their premise.

    Liked by 1 person

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