Six on Saturday – New Things

It’s Saturday again, I am joining the SOS crowd at http://www.thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com. I have some new blooms in my garden this week.

This is a Zinderella Peach Zinnia – these seeds are open pollinated, the flowers are fully double, semi double and single. None of them look like the photo on the seed package.

First ever buds on the Rangpur Lime tree. My neighbor planted the seed five years ago – it is seemingly well known it takes five years from seed to fruit. I have a Cuban Avocado tree the same age, they flower until April. I am watching the Avocado daily, leaf buds so far. I am excited about limes from the garden. The holes in the leaves are from Giant Swallowtail butterflies, citrus are the larval host plant.

The Jurassic Begonia is flowering..it is really a Lotusleaf Begonia (Begonia nelumbiifolia). It is easily four feet tall.

A Ylang Ylang tree (Cananga odorata) acclimating to sun, waiting for determination of its final location. This is the flower that supplies the fragrance for Chanel No. 5 perfume. The directions stated it takes one, two or three years to flower. Waiting some more….

A new spring container planting. This has brightened my day everytime I see it. In purple, Mona Lavendar Plectranthus, the chartruese is another Plectranthus (can’t we just call them Coleus!?) Peach Impatiens, a white Begonia and a bit of Graptosedum for the spiller.

My first Nasturtiums, I kept planting them at the wrong time of year..going to try some poor mans capers from the seeds. Should be another first.

28 comments on “Six on Saturday – New Things

  1. Noelle M says:

    Ylang Ylang trees are wonderful and what scent you will have when it flowers. Lucky you to be able to grow this.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Eliza Waters says:

    Wow, a four-foot begonia… who knew? Love your new planter, esp. the purple plectranthus.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. fredgardener says:

    Jurassic Begonia is amazing, I didn’t know it and it’s aptly named.
    The Ylang Ylang tree has a great foliage. Enjoy its wonderful scent which must be captivating

    Liked by 1 person

  4. First, I am so jealous. I just spent the morning cutting back dead foliage. I will look forward to seeing how your Ylang Ylang tree does and that begonia is gorgeous.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ugh, I am sorry about the deads. I hear it is much warmer there from my niece in Katy. I am curious to see what the YY does, I thought I was at their northern limit, but found there are a few about 20 miles up the road. Fingers crossed for flowers.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Ooh I like the look of Zinderella and my dinosaur crazy son would just love your Jurassic begonias!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The Begonia really is something else! Will you be adding any Nasturtium blooms to your salad or saving any for the seed pods?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. tonytomeo says:

    What?! I had no idea that Chanel Number 5 is made with ylang ylang! That is my mother’s fragrance!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Tony, I love it, though I prefer #19. and my mother wore Chanel No. 5, love it that your Mom does. Looking forward to the fragrance- in one to three years!

      Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        Do you know night blooming jasmine? It is a fragrance that those from Southern California crave but can’t find here. Retail nurserymen sell them star jasmine instead, which is nothing like it. I intend to get some for here, and to grow for those who crave it. To me, it is the fragrance of summer in Beverly Hills (in the Los Angeles Region). It does not survive even mild frost, but I can easily grow more.

        Liked by 1 person

      • yes, night blooming jasmine is common here. My neighbor has a huge Arabian Jasmine (10′) and I have a huge Tropical Gardenia, that is enough scent for me. Gardenias remind me of home, my mother always had one.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        Gardenias here are difficult to grow in situations that they should be pleased with, . . . but the healthiest and most vigorous are in situations that do not seem like they would be comfortable to gardenia.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I think Miracid is the trick.

        Liked by 1 person

      • tonytomeo says:

        It is not so simple here. The climate is tricky too. Both soil and climate are extremely variable throughout California. There are more climate zones in individual counties here than they are in several of the Midwestern states. What works for gardenias in the Santa Clara Valley is pointless in the Santa Cruz Mountains, just to the south.

        Like

  8. Gorgeous and fun, all rolled into one!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Roguegarden says:

    The delicate color gradation on your zinderella is lovely – pretty as a picture, whether it resembles one or no. The buds on your lime look promising. I hope that your harvest is plentiful. Wonderful to be able to grow ylang ylang in your back (or front) yard. I actually can’t imagine a whole tree’s blossoms worth of that intoxicating scent.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Jim Stephens says:

    So that’s what Plectranthus Mona Lavender is supposed to look like. We had one all through last summer, it grew well though the stems snapped off too easily in wind; it was easy to propagate, it had nice dark foliage but not a single flower did we ever see. Fabulous Begonia!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Cathy says:

    I think no zinnia I have ever planted resembles the picture on the seed packet! That is a lovely peachy one though. 😃 It will be interesting to hear what the flowers of the Ylang Ylang smell like one day… I love Chanel no 5. The lavender Plectranthus is gorgeous… I have never seen one flower before!

    Liked by 1 person

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